Why Outdoor Play is Vital For Primary Pupils

Primary pupils

Primary pupils love to play outside and doing so benefits them in many ways. It improves health, wellbeing and even helps them do better in the classroom. It also encourages the development of the key personal and social skills which they will need throughout their lives. The children, of course, won’t be too interested in any of this: for them, playing out is all about fun, excitement and moments of pure joy. However, with little opportunity to play out at home, primary schools that provide children with a well-equipped playground are laying the foundations for a brighter future for their pupils. Here’s why.

Long-term health benefits

The rise in obesity and type 2 diabetes among primary pupils is a key indicator of the decline in physical activity undertaken by children in today’s society. By providing the time, space and equipment to participate in physical activity in the playground, schools can help them become healthier. They will burn calories, improve fitness, become stronger and benefit from all the good things that come from these. What’s more, when these opportunities are provided at an early age, it increases the chances that children will maintain healthy lifestyles into adulthood.

Encouraging children to become active in the playground can be done in many ways. Simply giving them space to run is a good start, but you can incentivise them even more by adding playground markings for games like football or netball or which get them to jump and hop. Climbing equipment is also great for getting kids active and there is a wide range available to suit pupils from nursery to year 6. Another way is to install an outdoor stage, play some music and get the children dancing. If it gets them moving, it is good for their health.

Contributes to mental wellbeing

Mental health is a major issue for the UK and those with mental disorders often have issues that have wide-ranging consequences. According to the latest NHS study, 12.2% of boys and 6.6% of girls aged between 5 and 10 suffer from a mental health disorder. Indeed, over 5% of pupils start school with a disorder and the numbers increase throughout primary and secondary education.

While outdoor play is not a panacea for mental health, it does have benefits. The Mental Health Foundation states that taking part in low-intensity, aerobic exercise for around 30 minutes a day is the best way to increase positive moods in primary aged children. This can help those with depression and anxiety cope with their disorder while preventing others from developing it.

The Daily Mile initiative, which encourages pupils to run, jog or walk for a mile each day is an excellent way to contribute to mental wellbeing. For schools that lack the space, then playground markings can offer the chance to take part in other aerobic activities.

Outdoor play leads to better learning

Outdoor play benefits learning in several ways. Simply having a break from the classroom and doing something fun can recharge the learning batteries and bring flagging concentration levels back to full steam. Doing something active during free time also gets the blood circulating, boosting brain power – a fact backed up by a University of British Columbia study which found regular aerobic exercise increases the size of the hippocampus, the part of the brain involved in learning.

What’s more, playing outdoors enables children to develop many of the transferable skills essential for learning, like resilience, problem-solving, collaboration and concentration. Equipment such as Trim Trails obstacle courses, which offer both physical and cognitive challenges, are ideal for developing these skills and are also tremendous fun to play on.

Outdoor play can also improve classroom behaviour, with research showing that participation in physical activities helps children to stay on task and be better behaved. That’s good news for the teacher as well as the children.

The sociable child

The complex skills of social interaction take a while to master and primary pupils need plenty of opportunities to practice them. This is difficult to achieve in a classroom where time is directed and the rules of engagement are imposed on them. In the playground, there is scope for wider interaction and more freedom to make mistakes.

Taking part in playground activities enables children to learn important social skills, like negotiating, accepting group decisions and taking turns, while also helping them to become more effective communicators. Over time, they will need to make friends, ask for help and resolve disputes, fine-tuning their interactions with skills like tact, empathy and assertiveness.

Playground equipment that invites children to play together, whether for sport, games, roleplay or in creative pursuits is vital so that these important social skills can be honed.

Conclusion

Outdoor play is vital for primary pupils, giving them opportunities to improve physical health and mental wellbeing and to learn and interact better. Given the time, space and the right equipment at this stage in their development can have long-lasting benefits.

For inspiration and information, take a look at our Products Page.

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Discover the Latest Playground Equipment for Schools

The innovative minds here at ESP Play are always looking for new and better ways to help children learn and play in the school playground. Our latest playground equipment is designed to engage and enthral, motivating pupils to take an active part in physical and creative pursuits, whether that’s for learning or just for fun. Here are just some of the exciting new products we have on offer.

New imaginative playground equipment

literacy and phonics

Our already wide range of imaginative playground equipment has expanded even more with the addition of eleven new products. These include two playboats, Liberty and Spirit. At almost 4m long and 1.7m wide, the Liberty allows your pupils' creativity to set sail on many adventures. Complete with onboard seating, flagged mast, ship’s wheel, sail shade, a bow to lean on and a plank to walk, its ideal for imaginative play. Alternatively, there’s the Spirit, a twin decked vessel with a raised quarterdeck, accessed via a ship’s ramp, steps and climbing holds. The top deck features two telescopes, a porthole, a flagged mast and a ship's wheel. On the lower deck, you’ll find seating for the crew, a walking plank, a tall bow and a chalkboard where Blackbeard can draw the map to the treasure.

Other new, imaginative play equipment incorporates a wide use of chalkboards. These include a worktable, sorting trough, activity bench and signposts. There’s also a coat and bag station where things can be safely hung up out of the way during outdoor activities.

New playground markings

literacy and phonics

We’ve added 14 new playground markings to our existing collection. These include a variety of blank markings where we’ve removed numbers from the original designs. The Blank Circles, Multicoloured Circle Grid, Number Snake, Orange Way Number Ladder and giant 100 Square Blank Grid enable teachers to increase the challenge by getting pupils to fill in the numbers themselves with chalk or ask them to count without seeing the numbers.

We’ve also introduced other new playground markings, including basic shape markings, an EYFS Target Trainer and Ring Step and a fun Open Ended Frog Pond, complete with frog.

New Free Flow Packages

literacy and phonics

Free Flow is a popular, modular climbing frame system that provides lots of excitement in the school playground. It motivates children to increase participation in physical activity and to develop important physical skills like coordination and balance. It also helps pupils challenge themselves, deal better with risk and develop resilience.

Our latest Free Flow packages are Endeavour, Adventure, Pursuit and Quest. From the smallest system, Endeavour, through to the largest, Quest, you’ll find a growing range of climbing and other physical challenges. Quest offers the widest variety of features, including jungle bars, a traversing wall, a swinging tyre bridge, spiderweb ropes, balance beams, balance ropes and more. The Free Flow system is suitable for children aged 5 to 16.

New-fangled Tangled equipment

literacy and phonics

 

Our Tangled rope and beam challenge equipment has always been a highly popular choice for schools and we’ve made some significant updates to our range. First of all, we’ve added three brand new pieces. These are The Redback, The Nest and The Labyrinth. The Labyrinth is ideal for smaller spaces, being just 4.4m long and just over 1m wide. It also has no start or end point so pupils can get on and start playing from anywhere.

The Nest is over twice the width of The Labyrinth and offers a higgledy-piggledy set of fun climbing challenges that children will need to negotiate. With a wide range of starting points and an almost endless set of routes, there’ll always be lots of ways to enjoy this piece of apparatus. At over 5m long and 2.7m wide, The Redback is designed for larger playgrounds and offers even more opportunities to participate in physical activity, increase challenge and develop important skills, while also having lots of fun.

Aside from our new Tangled equipment, we’ve also updated some of our existing pieces. The Funnel Web, Lynx, Black Widow, Orb Weaver, Tarantula, Wolf, Huntsman and Nursery Web pieces now also come in painted versions, with black and green posts adding a touch of drama that makes them even more appealing to play on.

Conclusion

Working with schools up and down the country, we’re constantly getting ideas about the types of equipment children like to play on and the kinds of activities teachers need them to take part in. With these in mind, our team are constantly looking to improve our range of products to better meet the needs of pupils and teachers alike. Hopefully, you will find the latest playground equipment,  highlighted here, of value for your school.

For more information visit our New Products page.

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