School Playground Covid-19 Guidance for New Academic Year

Covid-19 guidance for playgrounds

The Covid-19 pandemic means significant changes for schools and nurseries reopening in September. Not only will this affect what goes on in the building but it will also impact the use of the playground, particularly where shared playground equipment, like climbing frames, play towers and sand pits are installed. Here, we’ll look at the latest government advice on what schools should be doing to keep their playgrounds safe in the new academic year.

The government’s guidance is for the governing bodies of schools and academy trusts that provide playgrounds with shared play equipment or outdoor gyms. While schools have to comply with existing health and safety legislation, the new guidance is non-statutory. This is because each school will have different circumstances and their playgrounds will have different layouts and equipment. However, schools will need to implement processes that protect people who use, clean and maintain their outdoor equipment.

Covid-19 risk assessment

Before playgrounds are allowed to be used, schools must first undertake a Covid-19 risk assessment. According to the government, this must be done in consultation with unions or, where representation isn’t in place, with the staff.

To ensure compliance with existing health and safety legislation, the assessment must examine the risk of potential Covid-19 transmission for anyone who uses the equipment, including pupils, teachers, teaching assistants and playground supervisors, as well as any cleaning and maintenance staff or those from third parties. The governing body’s responsibility is to “do everything reasonably practicable” to minimise risk.

Social distancing

Social distancing remains one of the government’s key strategies to reduce the spread of Coronavirus and this currently requires people to keep 2 metres apart or 1 metre with risk mitigations. The government recognises, however, that maintaining social distancing can be challenging in a playground setting and that schools will need to implement additional measures.

One option is to limit the number of pupils and staff who have access to the playground at any one time, perhaps adjusting the school timetable to put this in place. In addition, further social distancing can be implemented by limiting the number of pupils using a specific piece of equipment or reducing the length of time they can play on it.

Further measures include using signs to communicate the maximum number of users, increasing supervision to ensure pupils follow instructions, implementing a one-way travel route around the playground and between equipment and, where pieces of equipment are less than 2 metres apart, temporarily shutting one down.

Cleaning and hygiene

The cleaning of equipment is vital to prevent the spread of the virus, especially if it is being used by different pupil bubbles throughout the day. Schools are advised to clean busy touchpoints frequently. This includes equipment such as climbing frames, slides, play towers, play huts, crawl tunnels, exercise bars, gym equipment, gates, benches, picnic tables and bins.

If pupils are grouped into bubbles, cleaning is most effective if done after each bubble has left the playground and before the next bubble arrives. Cleaning products should be those which are effective against the virus but which do not pose injury or harm to users.

Face coverings

Under current Covid-19 guidance, face coverings are only required in enclosed public spaces and only for children under 11. While Schools Minister, Nick Gibb, said pupils over 11 will be expected to wear them on school buses and moving around school buildings, they are not required in classrooms as other protective measures are being introduced.

As playgrounds are not enclosed spaces, there is no current requirement for children over 11 to wear a mask. However, if social distancing is difficult to maintain when using playground equipment, it is an option that schools could consider.

Other considerations

Besides the guidance given above, other advice includes using playground posters and signage to remind pupils and staff of the school’s procedures and of general COVID protection advice; placing sanitising stations next to equipment and at entrances; providing more waste bins and increasing the frequency of rubbish collections, and banning the consumption of food or drink in the playground or on play equipment.

SEND pupils

The government has also issued advice on how schools should help pupils with additional needs in playground environments. For example, they may need more frequent reminders about new rules or require assistance moving between apparatus or carrying out hygiene regimes.

Conclusion

The new normal in schools is going to take a great deal of adjustment for pupils and staff alike in September. Being able to participate in play is vital to help children acclimatise to the new setup and begin to socialise again after months of lockdown. Hopefully, the advice given by the government and summarised here will help you provide a safe and inviting playground for your pupils. For more information, visit the government’s outdoor playground and gym guidance page.

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Social Play Ideas For Post-Lockdown Playgrounds

Primary pupils

According to mental health professionals, when children return to full-time education in September, schools should prioritise play and socialising over learning. After months of lockdown and with little opportunity for face to face interactions, experts say many children will be suffering from loneliness and isolation. Social play will help them overcome their loneliness and make it easier to overcome anxiety about being in an educational setting whose ‘new-normal’ seems alien. In this post, we’ll look at how the playground can be used to encourage and facilitate socialising and to support children on their transition back into education.

The value of social play

While children get plenty of opportunities to interact in the classroom, the activities they participate in and the topics of discussion are directed by the teacher. Only during free time, away from the teacher and the classroom rules, do they get the chance to engage with each other freely. This makes the playground an ideal place to facilitate and encourage social play. Doing so not only helps them readjust to life after lockdown; it aids their development, helping them acquire the valuable communication and social skills that they will depend upon throughout their lives.

Play is crucial for social and emotional development. It helps children to make friends and build relationships and it develops empathy, trust and an understanding of social norms. Indeed, play gives children the chance to learn from their mistakes: through falling out and making up, they learn how to manage emotions, resolve conflicts and develop resilience. It also provides opportunities to share their thoughts and feelings and to support one and other, something which will be crucial post-lockdown.

Communication skills are essential for social development and outdoor play provides a myriad of opportunities for verbal interaction. Interaction between children is needed to make choices about the activities they want to do and then to take part in them. They’ll need to negotiate, discuss, explain, take turns, ask and answer questions, listen and respond; learning as they do from interactions that went well and those which didn’t. It’s not just speaking and listening skills that they develop either, the playground is an ideal place to learn about non-verbal communication. They’ll discover how to read and respond to facial expressions, gestures and body language and hone their skills in using them.

Equipping your playground for social play

As all children are different, facilitating social play requires a range of playground equipment, this way you’ll be able to encourage every child to take part in activities where they can interact with others. Thankfully, there is equipment for all kinds of activity and something to suit everyone.

Social sports

Team sports are excellent for encouraging social interactions. It develops camaraderie, the sense of fair play and requires plenty of communication. Playground sports markings are the ideal way to encourage the participation of larger groups of children and with sports such as netball, football, basketball and rounders catered for, there’s something that will appeal to most children. There’s also a variety of nets, hoops, ball walls and targets that can be added to make the sports more fun.

Fun and games

Kids love playing games together and there is a multitude of equipment that will encourage them to socialise. These include fun and games playground markings for chess, hopscotch and even a mini roadway; outdoor tabletop games like snakes and ladders, Connect 4 and Ludo as well as battleship boards. There’s also table football, table tennis and skipping rope games.

Creative interactions

Another great way to get children playing together is through being creative. They can do this by drawing, chalking and painting together using a variety of outdoor drawing and chalkboards, making music with fun outdoor musical instruments, like xylophones, chimes and drainpipe drums or by singing together on a playground stage. They can also get creatively messy with a mud kitchen, sandpit or with water and sand play equipment.

Roleplay

Younger children love to get involved in roleplay activities and it is important for their social and emotional development that they get the opportunity. There is some fantastic outdoor roleplay equipment to inspire their imaginations, this includes under-over bridges, trains, storytelling chairs, shop/kiosk panels, carriages, playboats, wigwam posts, play huts and more.

Thrill-seeking play

Thrill-seeking play is excellent for getting children to interact and be sociable. It encourages them to collaborate to overcome challenges and to support each other; it gives opportunities for roleplay and discussion and lets children who have been cooped up over lockdown have a great deal of physical fun. ESP Play has a comprehensive range of climbing equipment, including Trim Trails obstacle courses, play towers, climbing walls, Tangled rope play equipment and FreeFlow modular climbing frame systems.

Conclusion

Social play has always been essential for children’s development and now, following the lockdown, it is also needed to address the isolation, loneliness and anxiety of children returning to school. If you are looking for playground equipment to provide better social play opportunities, hopefully, the ideas mentioned here will have given you some inspiration.

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How Schools Can Help Tackle Mental Health

A recent poll by the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) has shown that twice as many schools in England, 66%, are having to commission professional support and in-school counselling compared to 2016. Despite mental health being a high priority for the UK government, schools face growing numbers of pupils with mental health issues while support services are increasingly hard to procure. In this post, we’ll look at ways that schools can help tackle mental health in-house.

literacy and phonics

A whole-school approach

One of the first ways a school can move forward is to develop a school-wide approach to positive mental health. This includes the mental health of all the community: pupils, staff and parents. Mental wellbeing needs to be embedded not just in the curriculum, but in the entire life of the school, including in classroom practice, rewards and sanctions, play/free-time management and in enabling a work-life balance for all. At the same time, schools should try to encourage behaviours and attitudes that improve wellbeing.

Designated mental health coordinator

Creating a designated role for mental health gives the issue the important status it needs at management level and means that a whole-school approach can be better coordinated. The person in charge will have the authority to implement best practice and procedure as well as to monitor progress and evaluate impact. It also means systems can be centralised, reducing the chance of invisible cases.

A designated coordinator can also be the face of mental wellbeing within the school, being the first point of call, while also supporting staff, parents and pupils. They can also be the representative of the school when liaising with support services or colleagues from other schools.

Mental health training

67% of schools now undertake mental health training for their staff and this is vital to increase awareness of the various types of disorder that pupils may be affected by. It helps teachers to identify signs of mental illness so that those with potential disorders are given speedier help, and it enables teachers to improve classroom practice so that general wellbeing is enhanced and that those with disorders can cope better during the school day.

Training, of course, can be implemented in several ways. Schools can invite professionals in to address the entire staff or individual teachers can attend courses out of school and then feedback to the rest of the staff at a later date. Local clusters may also have support groups who deliver training in your area.

One key area of training is how to deal with a child who is having a mental health crisis. The NAHT survey reported that only 44% of headteachers felt confident their school could deal with such a situation.

Enabling openness

The first step to getting help is telling someone about your mental wellbeing. In schools, there are three hurdles which need addressing to enable this to happen. First of all, children need the language skills to enable them to talk about their problems. They need to know how to express their feelings so that they can tell their friends or their teachers what is happening to them. If a child lacks the ability to articulate how they feel, they may be unable to seek help.

Secondly, schools need to do everything they can to remove the stigma of mental health. This might not be such a major issue for younger children, but as they get older and more self-conscious, fear of other people finding out can make issues worse and prevent help being sought. This is equally true of staff who may also fear that their jobs are at risk if they come forward.

Finally, people need someone to tell. Although the mental health coordinator is perhaps the first port of call for serious concerns, all members of the community should be encouraged to support others, whether it is a friend, a pupil or a colleague.

Fun, outdoor exercise

The school playground can play an important role in improving mental wellbeing. Simply getting outside into the fresh air and away from the classroom is a natural mood-lifter in itself. However, if free time is made fun, it can help with issues of anxiety and depression and counteract the stress which classwork puts children under. That, of course, means equipping your playground with apparatus that will engage pupils in fun activities, whether that’s playing football, roleplay, making mud pies or digging up a sandpit .

Even more beneficial for mental wellbeing is when children are provided with opportunities to engage in physical activity. Sports markings, climbing frames, outdoor gyms, etc. all help children to take part in moderate or strenuous activities which have been proven to help prevent serious mental health issues developing and which make it easier for those with existing conditions to cope.

Conclusion

With 12.8% of pupils suffering from a mental health condition and a lack of external help, all schools are under increasing pressure to cope. Hopefully, the ideas mentioned in this post will help your school improve provision for your pupils.

If you are looking to make breaktimes more fun and to encourage more children to participate in physical activity, check out our wide range of playground equipment.

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6 Ways Your Pupils Can Benefit from The Daily™

If you’ve been watching ITV recently, you may have seen it’s been showing an advert for The Daily Mile, an initiative which aims to improve the health and fitness of every child by getting them to run, jog, walk or propel their wheelchairs for fifteen minutes, each school day.

If you haven’t seen the ad, check it out now.

As you can see, getting your school to participate in The Daily Mile is a great opportunity. This is why over 7000 UK schools are now participating and new schools are getting involved every day. Indeed, the UK initiative is so popular it's now been adopted in 55 countries across all continents: from Kettering to Kathmandu, children everywhere are being given the chance to improve their physical, social, emotional and mental health and wellbeing.

So, why is The Daily Mile so beneficial and why are so many schools taking the plunge? Here are six ways your school and your pupils can benefit from The Daily Mile.

1. Improves body condition

Just as a good breakfast sets you up for the day, good body fitness during your youth can have benefits long into the future. Unfortunately, the opposite is also true. It is good to know then, that doing The Daily Mile can have a positive effect on a child’s body composition. It improves cardiovascular health, makes bones denser and builds muscular strength.

Improving body composition while young can help the body defend itself against things like osteoporosis and heart disease later in life.

2. Helps fight obesity

As primary teachers will know, the National Child Measurement Programme measures the height and weight of pupils in reception and year six to ascertain whether they are at a healthy weight or not. According to their most recent literature, around 10% of reception pupils are very overweight. By year 6, the figure has doubled to 20% and the number of very overweight year 6 pupils has increased year on year.

When children take part in the daily mile, they will be physically active for around 75 minutes every week. That helps them burn more calories and, in doing so, goes some way to helping pupils maintain a healthy weight.

3. Can benefit certain physical health conditions

Regular physical activity has been shown to benefit a number of medical conditions, some of which are common in younger people. For example, those pupils who suffer from asthma or diabetes may find that The Daily Mile helps their condition.

4. Helps the development of physical skills

Developing physical skills is a key part of the EYFS and primary curriculum, so it is helpful to know that getting your pupils to take part in The Daily Mile has been shown to improve gross and fine motor skills as well as overall balance.

5. Improves mental health and wellbeing

GPs refer around 400,000 children a year for mental health issues such as anxiety and depression. At such a young age, not only do these conditions affect their personal lives, but they can also impede their academic progress. This can have a negative effect on their ability to get a place at university or achieve the career they want further down the line.

Regular physical activity, such as The Daily Mile, has been proven to have a positive effect on mental health, increasing happiness and reducing stress. Indeed, it doesn’t just help those with such conditions, it can also reduce the chance of mental health problems happening to others.

6. Understanding the importance of health

The organisers of The Daily Mile have discovered that children who participate become increasingly aware of the need to be healthy and are keener to take responsibility for it.

In a society like ours, where children are bombarded with the temptations of junk food and where a lot of free time is spent glued to a screen, many messages about leading healthy lifestyles don’t have the impact we want them to. If The Daily Mile is helping children to be accountable to themselves for their own health, this can only be a good thing.

Setting up a course suitable for the Daily Mile

If your school playground is 50 yards long, a child will need to run over 35 lengths to complete a mile. That may look like a challenge during week one, but as the weeks progress, simply running from one end to the other, over and over, is not going to keep everyone motivated.

What’s helping many schools, is to create a course suitable for the daily mile using existing pathways and incorporating the use of playground markings. Simple line markings can be used to create a more exciting and less repetitive route around the school that pupils will find more enjoyable to follow. At the same time, you can increase the challenge and the fun by adding a range of fun markings into the course, such as a roadway, twisty lines, hurdle markings, hopscotch steps and roundabouts. If your pathway needs to intertwine, you can even add a zebra crossing.

Of course, if you want to go further, you can also add bridges, Trim Trails obstacles, like jungle bars and balance beams, or even build in one of our modular Free Flow climbing frames. There’s no end to how exciting you can make your Daily Mile.

If you are looking for help creating a course for your school’s Daily Mile, call us on 01282 43 44 45.

'The Daily Mile' name and logo are trademarks of The Daily Mile Foundation, Hawkslease, Chapel Lane, Lyndhurst SO43 7FG (Registered Charity Number 1166911). All rights reserved.

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